OK, this is a bit out of order. After riding the bike and having 70 miles on it I found out the transmission mainshafts on other peoples bikes were galling the bushings. So I pulled the motor and went to Richie’s house. Dan Emerson came over for the day. BY the time I got to Richie’s I had 90 miles on the bike. When we opened it up the bushing was beginning to gall. Now for a little background. During Cannonball 12 several Deluxe’s had trans problems. After the race a request was made to have new mainshafts made. They were chromed to 32 microns which was nice smooth enough . So we pulled my shaft and put it on the lathe and buffed it with 600 grit and brought out the marks and made it shine bright.

There are a few thoughts on what happened and how to prevent this in the Deluxe transmission. Here are my thoughts, and you need to remember I am not an engineer or a master mechanic, just someone who has dumped a lot of $$ into his bike to be sure it was done well. The motor has an external oil pump and the feed line goes to the motor on the right side. My motor is running at 16 lbs pressure. The oil goes into internal lines in the engine case and they feed the babbit bearings thru the crank . The oil also travels through the crank and flywheel and clutch assembly and then splashes the transmission. The mainshaft fits in a bushing on each side of the trans and part of the bronze bushing is exposed. Through magic the oil is supposed to get to the bushing and lubricate the mains haft. We looked at some bushing Richie had in stock and saw that Henderson drilled the exposed part to allow oil to get down to the shaft. We think mine was an early shaft and was not bored. So we bored it and counter sunk the exposed hole thinking this would allow more oil to get down to the bushing.     Dan Emerson rode the 2012 Cannonball and completed the ride with 6 miles short of a perfect score. His trans suffered this same fate. Last winter he came up with a a way to get oil to the bushing. The bushing on the chain sprocket side has a locating pin in it. He made a fitting that would replace the pin and be a feed line through the bushing. While we were working on my trans, the Fourth coast crew was also repairing a few transmissions. The decision was made to “T” into the low pressure  line that the external oil pump feeds the timing gears with. The line is 5/16″, I t\”T” into it and then reduced it to a 1/4″ and fed that back to my trans bushing.    If you think about it, the bikes in the teens and 20s did not have good roads so were not driven all day at 60 mph and the average man was a good deal lighter.

More of the oil lines

More of the oil lines